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Atlas Team Member Sage Canaday talks about the importance of Consistency in Cross-Training across seasons. Most of the year (when I’m not on trails in my Atlas snowshoes) I’m a MUT Runner. “MUT” stands for Mountain-Ultra-Trail and it encompasses all the types of distance runs and races that I do. The spectrum of MUT Running Read More >

Atlas Team Member Sage Canaday talks about the importance of Consistency in Cross-Training across seasons.

Most of the year (when I’m not on trails in my Atlas snowshoes) I’m a MUT Runner. “MUT” stands for Mountain-Ultra-Trail and it encompasses all the types of distance runs and races that I do. The spectrum of MUT Running could include anything from a tame dirt trail 5km to 10km race, 100-miles on a synthetic track, or a 25km technical ascent up and down a 14,000’ mountain. Aside from short distance sprints or very short road races, the MUT category of distance running pretty much covers it all!

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I’ve found over my years of running track in college as well as marathons on the road as a post-collegiate that long periods of aerobic exercise pay dividends when it comes to an activity like snowshoeing or even climbing a mountain. However, after going full-time into MUT Running 3 years ago, my body has seemingly adapted new characteristics to tackle variable terrain and steep mountain slopes. The lateral movements required to dodge around rocks and turns on trails as well as the quad pounding descents off mountain tops have transformed my legs. The constant challenge and new variety of running events in MUT has taught me that changing variables in training can invigorate both the mind and body to perform better at all endurance activities. For example here are some lessons I’ve learned:

1. Running hills builds strength and speed (as well as lung power) that can help your flat running pace as well.

2. The key to transitioning from road running to trail/mountain running is to work on becoming more efficient on variable terrain. Specific training yields specific results (i.e. work on hills and technical trails if that is what you want to excel at).

3. Variety is the spice of life…and endurance sport (however, the self discipline and perseverance to accomplish and master a specific task is a noble endeavor to pursue as well).

4. Find “flow” in the mental/physical activities that you want to master (“flow” is basically like being “in the zone” and totally consumed by the challenge of an activity. I highly suggest the book “Flow” by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi).

5. Always keep an element of fun in your training and racing!